Adapting to Changing Light in Corporate Event Photography

Elaborate stage presentation with three full size cars revealed to an audience of business owners at a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Event Photography Case Study: Adapting to Changing Light

·         Type:            Multi Day Corporate Event

·         Location:     Las Vegas, Nevada, Mandalay Bay Event Center, Las Vegas Motor Speedway

·         Event Size:   Medium

·         Difficulty:   Advanced (stage, available light, night, awards,)

·         Elements:     Keynotes, General Session, Night, Special Conditions, Awards Presentation

·         Skills:         Experienced photographer, Challenging/Changing Lighting Conditions

·         Challenges: Special Condition, Changing Light, Fast Moving Awards Presentation

·         Fun Facts:    Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Fireworks

In this case study, I want to highlight the importance of an event photographer’s ability to  be adaptable and flexible particularly when it comes to lighting. Whether it’s available light or creating light, to be able to successfully capture larger events, event photographers need to have the experience and/or training to quickly assess and adapt to changing light. This particular assignment lasted just over a day and a half and provided a large variety of lighting challenges. Not only was the variety of lighting fun, but it also allowed me the opportunity to provide my clients with a wide variety of unique images.

Mandalay Bay Convention Center Venue Hallways elaborately decorated for a cocktail reception for a Corporate Event in Las Vegas and San Diego..

The assignment started with capturing an evening networking event and cocktail hour for the clients. I use the plural because I was hired by the production company for the event to not only capture the event as it unfolded, but to also take “beauty shots” and behind the scene shots of the work the production company for the clients various events.

In the first two shots, the venue (Mandalay Bay) converted the hallways outside of the actual ballrooms into a casual lounge feel and the production company wanted to make sure to get some great images so that they could use the shots to sell the idea to future clients. Even when not requested, it’s a good idea to get these shots so that you can share them with the production companies whether they are the ones to hire you or not. Developing relationships with production companies is one of the best ways to acquire leads and get repeat customers.

Details of an elaborate setup at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas for a cocktail hour and networking session for a corporate event.

I used a tripod mounted camera to get these shots and in camera HDR settings to insure that I was able to keep the highlights while exposing for the shadow. I was careful not to overdue the HDR effects and keep the images looking real and natural. Color balance was also important and sometimes with these images it’s easy to leave them a bit to warm. While it would have been possible to shoot this scene handheld, you would have had to use a high ISO and open up the aperture, limiting your depth of field.

Crowded cocktail hour and networking event during a Corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas by a San Diego Based corporate event photographer

Clients like to see rooms full of  happy people. It is a good sign that the work they have done has paid off in a successful event. They can also use these kind of images to share and sell the show or event for the following year and attract new attendees. Make sure you move around and find the right angle that shows the room or event at it’s fullest. People and objects in the foreground help fill space and create a busy feeling. Watch for empty chairs or spaces that may not seem obvious at first and look for angles that show off the room and any branding when possible. I stood on a slightly raised platform and hand held to get this shot. The slight raise in elevation keeps the shot looking natural and allows you to visually see how busy the rooms is by extending the viewers vision all the way to the end. A tripod could have been used but the advantage would have been nullified in some part because a relatively fast shutter speed was needed to keep the moving people in focus.

Capturing images of the food being served at a Corporate Event and Networking hour at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Cocktail hours and networking events are an important part of many corporate events your clients will invest a lot of time and effort to insure their attendees enjoy them. There will be many different kinds of offerings and entertainment available depending on the event, but food is usually a key component. If you’re lucky, the food will be displayed with attractive lighting but in my experience, that seldom happens so you will need to be adaptable. In the two examples I have posted, the first one is very colorful and the repetition of shapes is interesting but there is no light on the jars with the exception of standard, overhead room light. If properly exposed for the light that is available, I would either have to blow out the colorful lighting behind the jars or leave the colorful content inside the jars dark and unexposed. Neither option was particularly attractive so I chose to bounce some light from my on camera flash towards a white display that was positioned camera left. The key was not to over power the scene with flash, so using the flash in manual, I dialed in 1/16 power and  just added a pop of light to bring out the colors in the jars while exposing for the colorful lights in the background. Determining how much flash to use to keep the scene natural is a matter of experience but it is based on the overall brightness of the scene as well as the distance the flash is going to need to be bounced.

Food plated and waiting for attendees at a networking event during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas by a San Diego based event photographer

In the image of toasted sandwiches and jus in coffee cups, the light was provided from the heat lamps the offerings were sitting under. This kind of light is very harsh, very yellow and creates a narrow spotlight effect with the drop off around the edges being extreme. Camera settings were drastically different from the low light room settings I had been shooting so I had to make some major adjustments to ISO and exposure setting to keep this scene from being completely blown out. I also dropped the color temp to 2800 to eliminate as much yellow as possible. To avoid the spot light effect that this sort of set up creates, I moved in close and cropped out as much of the unlit area as possible keeping the image evenly lit. Fortunately, the coffee cups were white, making color correction relatively easy in post

Networking event attendees enjoying a cocktail hour during the first night of a corporate event held at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

The lighting setup I use for shooting candids of people in networking events is an on camera flash attached to a bracket (Custom Brackets RF -Pro) that allows me to flip the flash horizontal or vertical. This gives me a fair amount of flexibility to aim the flash in pretty much any direction to bounce if I need to. In these photos, I am using the flash more directly by either aiming it at my subjects or aiming the flash up. When I aim the flash up, I am not trying to bounce of the ceiling but instead I am using a Sto-fen over the top of the flash and using it like a light bulb of sorts.

Business owners enjoy networking at a cocktail hour during a corporate event being held at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

There is enough light in the room so that I can expose for the ambient and just add a pop of flash to fill in the shadows and brighten faces without making it obvious.  I usually place a Sto-fen flash diffuser on the flash to soften the light a little unless I am bouncing the flash, in which case I just stick it in my pocket.

Two business owners introduce themselves with a handshake and smiles at a networking event held during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

The procession of my photographs from room shots, to wide shots to details to intimate candids and portraits of people is how ideally, I like to work networking events. Get the room and details while they are fresh, then begin capturing people about an half hour after the event begins. My reasons are several fold. One, it usually takes some time for people to arrive, grab a bite to eat and get comfortable. They get a chance to see me moving around, capturing details and they get used to my presence. It also allows them to get a few drinks, find friends and start having fun. All of these things lead to natural, relaxed candids of attendees enjoying the event. This is what your client will be looking for. In these candids, the people have real smiles, are engaged and shaking hands and laughing. This helps to create images that project a successful event.

Event attendees smiling and posing for the camera at a networking event during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

People like to huddle in circles when they interact. That means invariably, your going to get shots of the backs of people heads and that seldom looks good. I try to find the angles that minimize this fact, and also look for intriguing enough expressions and reactions that distract from this. It does require some patience and willingness on your part as the photographer to stay vigilant and keep moving around to find those angles. You can also shoot “posed” candids where your subjects smile and look at the camera. I like to mix in these kind of shots with true candids. I am always on the look out for groups of three and five, (the camera likes odd numbers) who seem to be having a good time and have a relationship with each other that will result in fun natural posing and smiling. I also try to find lulls in the conversation so that I can quickly get their attention and I try to be ready with my settings and not make them wait while I fiddle with the camera or flash. Two quick shots and I’m out, letting them get back to their conversations. Some people are not comfortable having their photos taken and that’s okay. I know I don’t. Don’t force it if they are not interested, just say thanks and move on.

Behind the scenes photograph of the production control room for a large stage event for a opening general session for a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Both of these shots are production requested shots. A behind the scenes shot in the back of house, behind the stage and a front of house “beauty shot” of the stage before the session begins. Both shots were taken using the same technique and equipment. However, the shot of the backstage control room was extremely dark with only the monitors visible and the front of house stage shot was very bright. I used in camera HDR settings in both cases, with a tripod camera and a cable release. Pre set shot of an elaborate stage setup just before the opening of a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Both shots are “realistic” in the sense that you can see details in the darks, the screens and monitors are readable but what’s naturally dark is still dark in the photo and what is bright is still bright. It would be “unrealistic” to make everything evenly lit. In my opinion, this would look fake so avoid the temptation to overdue HDR effects. These shots are not possible without a tripod so keep one handy.

CEO addressing a crowded event venue during the opening remarks of a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Sometimes you get lucky and the production team does an outstanding job of lighting the stage. It is usually a product of how much money the sponsors want to spend. For this event, no expense was sparred and the lighting was incredible. Hence the production company wanting to make sure they had professional shots of the setup and general sessions. Granted, the lighting was exceptional, but it was still my job to make the images interesting. It would have been a shame to work with such great lighting and create just mediocre shots. Angles are important and I had attended rehearsals earlier in the day so that I would no when and where everything was happening. For this shot, I knew the little electric vehicle would be entering stage right but would then do a u-turn and end of facing the way it came in. The headlights add an extra dimension to the image. There is enough light on the crowd so that you know they are there while keeping everything realistic. Available light only.

Close up image of a CEO giving opening remarks with a small electric car on stage during a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

A little side step to the left and a long lens on my monopod, same scene, different look. Available light. Later in this study, I will talk about using fill flash on stage in certain situations but the light was well thought out and the presenter is lit from multiple angles with fill and key lights. Watch for hand gestures and expressions to make these kind of shots dynamic and interesting.

Audience of event attendees listening intently during a presentation at a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

From the on stage close-up, I simply turned my long lens towards the audience and waited for a bright scene to appear on the giant screen. The attentive audience was illuminated and I fired away. It’s hard to focus on every face and what each person is doing so be patient and take multiple shots in this scenario. People yawning, napping or looking down at their phones, (which looks an awful lot like they are napping) can ruin this shot. The idea is intent, interested faces, learning from the presentation. Available light from the on stage screen.Paralympic athletes enter stage right to thunderous applause during the motivational segment of a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Another right angle at the right time shot. The back lighting is from car head lights and it adds a dynamic to the shot that would be there without it. Being in the right spot was not luck. From attending rehearsals, I knew when and where this would happen and moved into place shortly before. I mention car head lights. This was a Toyota sponsored event and the stage was set so they could drive their latest models on stage for their dealers to preview. The trick for me was that most of the cars had not been introduced to the general public so, for privacy reasons, I was asked not to shoot any of the cars that appeared behind the speakers on stage. It was a challenge, but my moving to the left and right edges of the stage, I was able to capture all the action without revealing the automobiles.

Olympian athletes pose for a fun selfie on stage during a motivation presentation part of a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

This was a scripted “candid moment” and it was very important for the client that I capture it. These can’t miss moments and requests from your clients are critical to the success of the shoot. Make sure you know when and where to be and that you have backup if possible. You won’t get a second chance.

Mid range stage image of Olympians during a motivation segment of a general session during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

From the same location where I shot the selfie. Just stayed put and went with a wide lens to get an image of the overall scene as the athletes were wrapping up their segment. Available light, handheld.

Large venue decorated and filled with diners at an Awards presentation and dinner for attendees during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Immediately following the general session, the attendees were directed to a large ballroom that had been set up for an awards ceremony and luncheon. This is were adaptability starts to become a necessary skill. We have now gone from a dimly lit cocktail hour, to a well lit, action packed general session, and now next door for a fast paced awards ceremony.

Examples of no flash and fill flash while photographing speakers and presenters during an awards ceremony and dinner during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

I am posting these side by shots to show a subtle but important difference that you need to be aware of with stage lighting. On stage during the general session, the lighting bathed the speakers from multiple angles and was easy to work with. For the awards ceremony, most if not all the light is coming from lights positioned in the front of the stage and does little to illuminate the sides of the speakers creating harsh light and dark shadows unless you are facing the stage. In order to create a more pleasing shot of the speaker, I am using on camera flash, aimed directly at the subject to fill in the shadows. I have the flash set on manual and at about 1/8th power to fill but not over power the available light. This is professional event photography.Large group of award winners posing on stage during an awards ceremony during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Awards ceremonies move fast. They generally don’t stop if you have a malfunction and you probably won’t be asked back if you miss the shots due to equipment failure. Best to be prepared with a backup set. For this event, I had a second identical camera/flash setup just next to the stage with extra batteries and a third flash just in case. The stage for the awards was well lit, and the participants knew where to stand so things went pretty smoothly. I generally mount a flash on my camera with a Stofen point up. I do this, not to illuminate, but so that my subjects can see the flash and know the picture(s) have been taken. I pre-focus as they are lining up and quickly fire two shots. It’s important to get the shot, but it is also important to keep things moving. Event planners like it that way.Detail photograph of desert served to attendees during an awards presentation during a corporate event at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas

Just a simple shot of the dessert offerings towards the end of the luncheon. Shots like this are important to filling out the story of the event and highlighting details that your clients have planned and coordinated. Plus these shots can be fun. Here I set the exposure in camera for the available room light and then manual set the flash to bounce of a wall, camera left to accent but not overpower the deserts.  The light angled off the wall, creates a soft, directional light that is much better than using direct flash or auto settings. I would like to have had a direct flash shot to compare this too but I really didn’t even consider the possibility.

Press tower located in the infield at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway during a corporate event and corporate outing in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

The event moved outdoor to the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in the early afternoon. If you are not familiar with Las Vegas, we are located in the desert and we have bright sunlight and cloudless days about 90% of the year. This can create harsh lighting which we have learned to deal with. The motor speedway does not offer a lot of shade so we were required to work with that harsh lighting. The trick is to either look for reflected light, or use on camera flash to avoid the strong shadows on people faces, in eye sockets and under hats. Of course you can use shade when you can find it, but you have to be aware that you will probably blow out any background detail that is not in the shade.

Attendees enjoying rides on the race track during a corporate event and corporate outing at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

The bright sunlight is great for colors and it can really make things pop.

Race ready version of a popular passenger automobile prepared to give rides to attendees at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Eager attendee getting last minute instructions before climbing into a race car at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Trucks carrying event attendees through an exciting obstacle course in the infield of the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

When not shooting faces, the direct sunlight is not really a problem and you can actually see in the sky that we had a few clouds that day.

Excited attendee describing her ride in a race car at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

It’s when you start to shoot faces that you begin to have to deal with the harsh shadows caused by the down lighting. In this case the light is striking her face, under the helmet so we can see her expression. It also help that the concrete track is a neutral gray and is reflecting light back up and into the faces giving us some detail.

Attendees posing for the camera during a ride along at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

The trick here is the use on camera flash in such a manner that it brightens faces without being obvious or over powering. At times, I like to set my auto output on the flash to -2ev to -3ev just to get a pop of light.  On Canon flashes particularly, it seems they are easily fooled by black or white objects and the output can be very inconsistent, in these cases I will manually set the flash and test the results to insure I am getting the desired effect. For instance, a manual setting of 1/8 power output on a bright day gives me a little pop. I then just need to maintain a consistent distance from my subjects, maybe 12 feet when I fire. These are not absolute numbers so you will need to experiment and adjust as the light changes. A final point. Bright sunny days require pretty high f-stop/ shutter speed combinations making it difficult to get your flash to sync with the camera’s low sync speed. The standard is 1/60 but can range as high as 1/180 on my Mark IV. This is still to slow for bright sunlight and  proper ambient exposure. My trick is to always carry a polarizing filter. This gives you 4 additional stops to play with effectively becoming a Neutral Density Filter.

Elaborate setup for a corporate outing including a stage and ferris wheel in the infield at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Para Olympians compete in wheel chair basketball with event attendees at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

As the sun begins to get low, the main grandstands are beginning to shade the infield where the main event is taking place. This shot was taken when the balance was about right. The contrast will continue to grow until the sun sets when everything will once again even out for a short time.

Artist creates colorful designs on an automobile during a demonstration at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

It’s approaching dusk in the infield during the event and we are beginning to use fill flash to separate and light our subjects a bit. The trick here it is to balance the flash with the daylight so that it’s not too obvious.

Entertainers during a carnival and on stage musical venue at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Singer performs on stage for an enthusiastic audience of attendees at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Singer poses with an attendee and selfies during a corporate event and outing the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Of course their was a concert! Concert lighting is generally pretty easy to work with and the productions crews do a great job of creating fun, lively and colorful lighting you can use to your advantage. In this case, they were using newer LED’s so balancing the waning daylight with the concert lighting was easy enough. Tungsten lighting would have been nice though because we would have balance for the warm stage lighting which would have produced deep, stunning blue skies in the background. I’m not complaining though.

Balanced evening light with accent and spotlights of an automobile display during a corporate event and outing the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

As dusk begins to settle in, we get the happy hour of “night shooting.” The point where the artificial lighting balances with the sky, creating deep blue colors and backgrounds. This is the best time to shoot skylines, architecture and buildings to get that deep blue sky while still retaining detail in the buildings and lights. This time happens fast so be alert and patient. Once it passes, the artificial light takes over and you loose details and are left with black, detail-less skies.

Ferris Wheel lit up at dusk during a corporate event and outing the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Classic, longish exposure of a ferris wheel. This is hand held, probably 1/15 of second with an image stabilized lens.  Anything longer would have required a tripod but we will still get a nice effect and a beautiful blue color in the sky. You’ve got about a 10 minute window for this particular shot.

Fireworks fill the sky behind a spinning ferris wheel during a corporate event and outing the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

Firework shots. Handheld and I simply exposed for the fireworks as they burst. The display was big enough and fast enough that I really didn’t have to time my exposures. Just point and shoot at the right exposure for the Ferris Wheel lights and fire away.

A crowd of attendees look up at the night sky to watch a firework display during a corporate event and outing the Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas as photographed by a San Diego Event Photographer

There was also enough available light from the displays and stage to allow me to expose for the fireworks and still capture the crowd as they enjoyed the show.

To sum up a rather long article. Being able to adapt to the changing lighting conditions and challenges, will allow you to be confident in accepting any event gig that comes your way. Knowing your camera, its abilities and limitations as well as being able to use the light around you will add a professional dimension to your event photographer that your clients will value. Flash is a critical tool as well and knowing how to use it subtly but effectively will take your event photographer to a whole new level.

 

About

Now based out of San Diego, John Morris has been a successful corporate event photographer in Las Vegas for the past 15 years. John also teaches and coaches photography and business to aspiring photographers.